19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2525



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace


powered by centersite dot net
Health Sciences
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Virtual House Calls for Speedy, Effective Parkinson's CareSeven Imaging Biomarkers Tied to Cognition in Male FightersDiabetes Drug Shows Promise Against Parkinson'sCombined MRI Might Help Predict Brain Damage in BoxersMedical Reality Catches Up to Science FictionNoninvasive Brain Test May Pinpoint Type of DementiaIn Mice, Brain Cells Discovered That Might Control AgingScans May Show Consciousness in 'Comatose' PatientsBoxers, MMA Fighters May Face Long-Term Harm to Brain: StudyFDA Panel OKs What May Soon Be First Gene Therapy Approved in U.S.Early Parkinson's May Prompt Vision ProblemsWhole-Genome Sequencing of Uncertain Clinical UtilityCould Shift Work Damage Your DNA?Gene Sequencing May Reveal Risks for Rare DiseasesRogue Genes May Cause Some ALS CasesSticky Brain 'Plaques' Implicated in Alzheimer's AgainEven Your Bones Can Get Fat, Mouse Study SuggestsDoes a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk?MicroRNA Biomarker Signature Identified for Allergic AsthmaHaywire Immune Cells May Help Cause BaldnessRegion in Brain Associated With Fear of Uncertain FutureBrain Scans Spot Where Fear and Anxiety LiveGene Therapy Might Someday Mend Badly Broken BonesLife Expectancy Slighter Shorter With Parkinson's, DementiaStudy Looks at Parkinson's Effect on Life SpanBody Cooling May Help Brain After Cardiac ArrestDo You Overeat? Your Brain Wiring May Be WhyGene Mutation May Speed Alzheimer's DeclineIs This Enzyme Making You Fat?Type 2 Diabetes May Be Bad for Brain Health'Brain Age' May Help Predict When You'll DieParkinson's Disease May Originate in Gut, Study SaysBlood-Based Genome Testing Feasible for Rapid Mutation AssayBlood Test May Gauge Death Risk After Surgery150-Year-Old Drug May Shorten 'Off' Time for Parkinson's PatientsBrain May Be Organized by Functions, Not Body PartsBody Temperature Might Give Clues to ComaCould Young Blood Boost the Aging Brain?A 'Brainwave' to Help Fight PTSDDizziness in Parkinson's May Be Due to Cerebral HypoperfusionMisunderstood Gene Tests May Lead to Unnecessary MastectomiesScientists Extend Lives of Mice With ALSFDA Approves 1st Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Risk TestsFDA OKs 1st At-Home Genetic Tests for 10 Disorders'SuperAgers' Have Less Whole-Brain Cortical Volume LossHigh Thyroid Hormone Levels Tied to Stiffer ArteriesBrain Changes May Mark Risk of Financial Exploitation in SeniorsRegular Exercise Slows Decline Even in Advanced Parkinson's DzBrain-Computer Link Restores Some Movement to Quadraplegic ManScientists Spot Gene for Rare Disorder Causing Deafness, Blindness
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Mental Disorders
Mental Health Professions
Alzheimers Disease and other Cognitive Disorders

150-Year-Old Drug May Shorten 'Off' Time for Parkinson's Patients

HealthDay News
by By Steven ReinbergHealthDay Reporter
Updated: Apr 21st 2017

new article illustration

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An old standby drug seems to help patients with advanced Parkinson's disease through the difficult times when their usual medication stops working, a new trial suggests.

As the movement disorder progresses, the effectiveness of the usual drug, levodopa, wears off more quickly after each dose, the researchers explained.

Patients can experience so-called "off" times, which can result in stiffness and leave them immobilized until the levodopa kicks in again.

During these off times, the injectable drug apomorphine (Apokyn) can significantly shorten the period before levodopa takes over, the investigators found.

"The results confirm what had been expected based on decades of clinical experience with apomorphine infusion in Europe," said lead researcher Dr. Regina Katzenschlager, a guest professor at the Medical University of Vienna in Austria.

"When fluctuations in the response to medication taken by mouth are no longer well-controlled and periods of bad mobility become burdensome, apomorphine infusion may provide relief to patients with Parkinson's disease," she added.

One Parkinson's expert said the findings give patients another option.

"This technology will hopefully offer a new avenue for patients requiring treatment for off medication periods. Although the results were not as robust as deep brain stimulation or the Duopa pump, it will add an important option to the treatment arsenal," said Dr. Michael Okun. He's medical director of the U.S.-based National Parkinson Foundation.

The Duopa pump, which was approved in 2015 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, delivers medication directly to the small intestine, significantly reducing off times, according to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research.

For the new 12-week phase 3 study, Katzenschlager and her colleagues randomly assigned 107 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease to either infusions of apomorphine or a placebo. Daily infusions were given over 14 to 18 hours via a small portable pump.

Patients given apomorphine had on average 2.5 hours less off time, compared with those receiving a placebo, whose reduction in off time averaged only 30 minutes.

The improvement was seen within the first week of treatment, and patients on apomorphine experienced an increase in "on" time -- without the involuntary movements that are often seen with levodopa, the researchers reported.

When patients were asked to evaluate their treatments, those who received apomorphine gave their treatment higher scores at week 12 than those who received a placebo, Katzenschlager's team said.

Among patients receiving apomorphine, 71 percent felt an improvement, compared with 18 percent of those who received a placebo. Nineteen percent of the patients receiving apomorphine worsened, compared with 45 percent of those on a placebo. Apomorphine was well-tolerated and no serious side effects were seen, the researchers added.

The study results are scheduled for presentation next week during the American Academy of Neurology annual meeting, in Boston. Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

The study was funded by British-based Britannia Pharmaceuticals Ltd., the maker of apomorphine.

Apomorphine was first produced in 1865 and began to be used to treat advanced Parkinson's disease in the United States in 1950. Its use increased in the 1990s, when European doctors starting using infusions of the drug to treat fluctuations in mobility that could not be controlled by pills, Katzenschlager said.

Another U.S. neurologist said the new study backs up what was previously found.

"This is the first randomized study showing the positive effects of apomorphine, an old drug that has been available for the treatment of Parkinson's disease," said Dr. Paul Wright, chair of neurology at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y., and Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y.

"This study essentially confirms our knowledge from prior trials," he said.

The only drawback to apomorphine is that it has to be infused. "The drug, while effective, is not as easy to administer as a pill," Wright said.

More information.

For more information on Parkinson's disease, visit the National Parkinson Foundation.