19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2525



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace


powered by centersite dot net
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Too Much Takeout Food Threatens Kids' HealthMom-to-Be's High Blood Sugar May Raise Baby's Odds for Heart DefectsFamily Meals Serve Up Better Behaved KidsTech at Bedtime May Mean Heavier KidsNew Hope for Kids With Multiple Food AllergiesHeath Tip: Give Age-Appropriate ToysPrenatal Sugar Intake May Increase Asthma Risk in OffspringMoms' Soda Habit in Pregnancy May Boost Kids' Odds for AsthmaPreventing Childhood Accidents at HomeDating Violence Tied to Spankings in ChildhoodSmartphone Pics Help Docs ID Kids' Skin ConditionMore Than Half Today's Children Expected to Be Obese at 35Time Management for Busy Families60 Percent of U.S. Kids Could Be Obese by Age 35Health Tip: Is Stress Interfering With Your Child's Sleep?Health Tip: Travel Safely With a ChildShaming Overweight Kids Only Makes Things WorseFlu Shot Could Help Your Kid Avoid HospitalHealth Tip: Safety Advice for the HolidaysAccurate Diagnosis Seen With Photographs of Skin ConditionsIf Dad Has Depression, Kids Might Develop It, TooKids Still Getting Risky Painkiller After TonsillectomySport Sampling in Children Tied to More Exercise in AdolescenceMusic, Video Help Sixth-Graders Master Hands-Only CPRChildhood Spanking Could Heighten Adult Mental Health WoesHealth Tip: Prevent Germs at the Doctor's OfficeInfluenza Vaccines in Pediatric ERs Likely Cost-EffectiveCooling Down Sibling Rivalries When They Heat UpDoes All That Social Media Time Harm Young Minds?Helping Children Cope When a Mass Tragedy Strikes'Good Ole Days' Were Better for Kids' Health, Adults SayTV Ads Still Push Unhealthy Foods at KidsSchool-Based Food Co-op Tied to Improved Diets in ChildrenWorking With Your School NurseChildren of Immigrants Less Likely to be Up-to-Date on ShotsHealth Tip: Have Fun on Halloween, Despite AsthmaHelmets Too Rarely Used in Baseball and SoftballKids' High Blood Pressure Often OverlookedKeep Halloween Spooky, But SafeKids' Food Allergies, Especially to Peanuts, Are on the RiseHealth Tip: Talk To Your Kids About a TragedyHealth Tip: Defining CyberbullingASA: Botox Injections Beneficial for Migraine in ChildrenTrauma Takes a Toll on Half of U.S. KidsMedical Marijuana Won't Help Most Sick KidsScoliosis Screenings Can Help Catch Spine Problem EarlyArthritis Can Strike ChildrenPlan an Allergy-Safe Halloween for Your ChildHappier Mealtimes, Healthier Eating for KidsAAP Releases List of Often-Unnecessary Tests
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting

When Families Lack Insurance, Kids' Dental Woes Rise

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Apr 10th 2017

new article illustration

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- American children without dental insurance are far less likely to receive necessary care for their teeth than kids with coverage, a new survey finds.

Toothaches and other dental problems that interfere with eating, sleeping or school performance are twice as common for kids without dental coverage, researchers found.

The findings were released as Republican lawmakers discuss major changes to Medicaid and other programs that provide dental insurance to many families and children.

"This survey speaks loud and clear -- coverage counts," said Meg Booth, executive director for the Children's Dental Health Project. The Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit conducted the survey.

The nationwide poll included more than 600 parents of children up to age 21.

Overall, 13 percent of parents said that in the past year their children needed dental care but weren't able to receive it. The rate was nearly three times higher among uninsured children (26 percent) than among those with insurance (9 percent).

Cost was cited by more than half of parents as the reason why their children did not receive needed dental care.

Low-income and minority parents were more likely to say their children did not receive needed dental care. Rates were 28 percent for those with annual incomes below $30,000, and 34 percent for Hispanics.

The survey was conducted in early March. It also found that Hispanic, Asian and black parents were far more likely than white parents to say their children visited an emergency room for a dental problem in the past year.

"When children are covered by Medicaid, CHIP [Children's Health Insurance Program] or private insurance, they are more likely to have regular dental visits. And they are far less likely to have serious oral health problems that can cause pain and disrupt their lives," Booth said in a news release from the group.

More information

The U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion has more on children's dental health.