19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace

 

 

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction and Types of Depressive DisordersRelated Disorders / ConditionsHistorical and Current UnderstandingsBiology, Psychology and SociologyTreatment - Medication and PsychotherapyAlternative Medicine and Self-Help ResourcesSpecial IssuesReferences
More InformationTestsLatest News
Brexit Had Brits Turning to Antidepressants: StudyDepression Is a Risk for Teens, Adults With EpilepsyStimulating One Brain Area May Ease Tough-to-Treat DepressionAnti-Seizure Drug May Be New Weapon Against DepressionMichael Phelps Champions the Fight Against DepressionFacebook Posts May Hint at DepressionDo Dimmer Days in Pregnancy Raise Postpartum Depression Risk?Depression Strikes Nearly 1 in 5 Young Adults With Autism: StudyNew Dads Can Get the Baby Blues, TooHealth Tip: Help a New Mom With Postpartum DepressionCould a Blood Test Help Spot Severe Depression?Treating Depression May Prevent Repeat Heart AttackSupportive Managers Key When a Worker Is DepressedIs Depression During Pregnancy on the Rise?Know the Signs of Postpartum DepressionAre Your Meds Making You Depressed?Depression, Money Woes Higher in Heart Patients With Job LossSnubbed on Social Media? Your Depression Risk May RiseNever Ignore DepressionStudy Affirms What Many Know: Antidepressants May Lead to Weight GainECT Effective for Treatment-Resistant DepressionRates of Major Depression Up Among U.S. Insured, Esp. YouthResistance Exercise May Reduce Depressive Symptoms in AdultsDepression Striking More Young People Than EverDepression May Dampen MemoryCould Mom-to-Be's Antidepressants Have an Upside for Baby's Brain?Exercise Your Blues AwayGrip Strength Indicative of Cognition in Major DepressionKetamine Nasal Spray Shows Promise Against Depression, SuicideTelltale Clues That Your Child Is DepressedPrenatal Exposure to SSRI Tied to Fetal Brain DevelopmentDepressive Symptoms Tied to Diabetes Self-ManagementAbandoning Your Workouts May Bring on the BluesMany Grad Students Struggle With Anxiety, DepressionRelapse in Major Depression Linked to Brain Cortical ChangesIL-6 Levels Predict Response to ECT in Depressive Disorder1 in 20 Younger Women Suffers Major DepressionHeart-Healthy 'DASH' Diet May Also Help Lower Depression RiskGuidelines Updated for Managing and ID'ing Adolescent Depression21 Reviewed Antidepressants Top Placebo for Major DepressionAntidepressants Do Work, Some Better Than Others: StudyTreatment Initiation for Depression Low in Primary CareDuring 2013 to 2016, 8.1 Percent of U.S. Adults Had DepressionDepression Common in U.S., Women Hit HardestNo Proof At-Home 'Cranial Stimulation' Eases DepressionAcne Linked to Increased Risk of Major Depressive DisorderMany With Depression Delay, Avoid TreatmentPostnatal Depression Tied to Child Behavioral ProblemsTalk Therapy May Be Worth It for Teen DepressionCognitive Behavioral Therapy Cost-Effective in Depressed Teens
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Suicide
Addictions: Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Pain Management

Ketamine Nasal Spray Shows Promise Against Depression, Suicide

HealthDay News
by By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Apr 17th 2018

new article illustration

TUESDAY, April 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a small, early study, a nasal spray containing the club drug ketamine appears to quickly help ease depression and even curb thoughts of suicide.

Psychiatrists were cautiously optimistic about the anesthetic's potential for treating the mood disorder.

"This study only had 68 people enrolled, which is a limitation, so there really needs to be larger-scale studies before being able to confidently recommend ketamine as a first-line choice," said Dr. Matthew Lorber, a psychiatrist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. He wasn't involved in the new study, which was funded by drug maker Janssen.

Longer-term studies also need to be conducted, Lorber added, "but ketamine is certainly an exciting option that holds a lot of promise, especially when traditional medications have failed."

Ketamine has a checkered history, and is perhaps best known as the recreational club drug "Special K." But researchers have also noted its effects in easing signs of depression.

So, a group led by Dr. Carla Canuso, of Janssen Research and Development in Titusville, N.J., conducted a study involving 68 people diagnosed with major depression. The participants were randomly assigned to receive either a "dummy" placebo nasal spray, or ketamine in a nasal spray form called esketamine.

All of the participants were deemed to have such severe depression that they were at "imminent suicide risk," the researchers said. They were already using standard antidepressants and continued to do so throughout the study.

Canuso's team then tracked the effects of esketamine at four hours after use, 24 hours later and 25 days later. The study was "double-blind," meaning that neither the researchers nor the participants knew which people were taking esketamine and which were taking the placebo.

The result: At the four-hour and 24-hour mark, there was "a significantly greater improvement" --- between 30 and 40 percent reductions -- in depression scores and a lowering of suicidal thoughts for those taking the esketamine nasal spray.

The effect did not last to the 25-day mark, however. Still, the study is "proof-of-concept" that "intranasal esketamine may be an efficacious treatment for rapid reduction of depressive symptoms, including suicidal ideation [thoughts] in patients assessed to be at imminent risk for suicide," Canuso's team concluded.

The study was published April 16 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

The researchers noted that assessments of depression level and suicide risk were made by both the patients and their physicians.

Side effects did occur for some participants and included nausea, dizziness, dissociation (a sense of being disconnected from reality) and headache, the researchers said.

And while the benefits seen in this small study are encouraging, Canuso's team stressed that ketamine does come with a potential for abuse.

In an accompanying editorial, journal editor Dr. Robert Freedman stressed that "protection of the public's health is part of our responsibility as well, and as physicians, we are responsible for preventing new drug epidemics."

For his part, Lorber thinks that if longer, larger studies pan out, esketamine might have a role to play in resolving short-term suicidal crises.

"Traditional antidepressants typically take four to six weeks before there is an improvement in depression, and they have not been shown to decrease the incidence of suicide, so the quick response combined with the improvement in suicidality sets ketamine apart from traditional medications alone," he said.

Dr. Robert Dicker helps direct child and adolescent psychiatry at Northwell Health in New Hyde Park, N.Y. He agreed that new and better depression medications are needed.

"One must keep in mind that the prevalence of depression in our adult population is high -- 1 in 15," Dicker said. "That depression is the most common diagnosis related to suicide [and] 1 million American adults attempt suicide [each year].

"A large number of adults being treated for depression are resistant to our current treatments, so the need to develop new treatment approaches are tremendous," he added. "The possible utility of ketamine in treating this population is an important avenue of study."

More information

Find out more about depression at the American Psychological Association.