19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace

 

 

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction and Types of Depressive DisordersRelated Disorders / ConditionsHistorical and Current UnderstandingsBiology, Psychology and SociologyTreatment - Medication and PsychotherapyAlternative Medicine and Self-Help ResourcesSpecial IssuesReferences
More InformationTestsLatest News
Depression Plus HIV Can Turn DeadlyBrain Stimulation May Soothe Severe DepressionFussy Baby May Raise Mom's Risk of DepressionAbuse in Childhood Tied to Brain Changes and Later DepressionFDA Approves First Drug for Postpartum DepressionNutritional Supplements Don't Ward Off Depression: StudyFDA Approves Ketamine-Like Drug for Severe DepressionFDA Poised to Approve Ketamine-Like Drug to Ease DepressionAcne Drug Accutane May Not Depress Mood After AllHealth Tip: Beat the Winter BluesAHA News: Post-Stroke Depression Common Among Black, Hispanic SurvivorsHealth Tip: Recognizing Signs of Depression in TeensCould Germs in Your Gut Send You Into Depression?Simple Treatments to Banish Winter BluesMillennials' Odds for Depression Rise With Social Media UseListen Up! Hearing Loss Tied to Late-Life DepressionHealth Tip: Risk Factors for Depression After PregnancyHead to the Movies, Museums to Keep Depression at BayThe Link Between Social Media and DepressionMany Say Ketamine Eased Their Depression, But Is It Safe?Docs Should Screen for Depression During, After PregnancyBrexit Had Brits Turning to Antidepressants: StudyDepression Is a Risk for Teens, Adults With EpilepsyStimulating One Brain Area May Ease Tough-to-Treat DepressionAnti-Seizure Drug May Be New Weapon Against DepressionMichael Phelps Champions the Fight Against DepressionFacebook Posts May Hint at DepressionDo Dimmer Days in Pregnancy Raise Postpartum Depression Risk?Depression Strikes Nearly 1 in 5 Young Adults With Autism: StudyNew Dads Can Get the Baby Blues, TooHealth Tip: Help a New Mom With Postpartum DepressionCould a Blood Test Help Spot Severe Depression?Treating Depression May Prevent Repeat Heart AttackSupportive Managers Key When a Worker Is DepressedIs Depression During Pregnancy on the Rise?Preventive Intervention for Premature Infants Effective
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Suicide
Addictions: Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Pain Management

Simple Treatments to Banish Winter Blues

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Jan 15th 2019

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The gray days of winter bring many people down, but a few simple steps can pep you up, an expert says.

A condition known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD) can cause feelings of sadness or depression, lack of energy, problems sleeping, moodiness, changes in appetite and loss of interest in usual activities.

"It is most common among people who live far north or south of the equator and usually occurs in fall and winter, although some people experience SAD in the spring," said Dr. Madhavi Singh, a family medicine doctor with Penn State Health.

"More women than men are diagnosed with this disorder, which most commonly appears between ages 20 and 30," Singh said in a health system news release.

Although the causes of SAD aren't known, it's thought that three factors are involved. Shorter days may disrupt your body clock and affect sleep, while a drop in serotonin levels linked to reduced sunlight can affect mood. Also, lower melatonin levels that occur in cold months with less sunlight can disrupt sleep.

To help chase the winter blues, Singh recommended the following:

  • Get more light into your home by turning lights on, opening blinds, and cutting back bushes that block windows.
  • Take a 60-minute walk outdoors every day, even if it's cloudy.
  • Exercise three or four hours before going to bed.
  • Fight the temptation to stay indoors. Keep socially active.
  • Don't drink caffeine in the afternoon or evening.
  • Don't go to bed hungry -- have a light snack.
  • Don't take your smartphone or tablet to bed -- keep the room dark.
  • Keep a regular sleep schedule.
  • Sleep only as much as needed to feel rested.

If you suffer from SAD, see your doctor, Singh said.

One of the most effective treatments is light therapy, she said. The treatment uses a special light box that emits full-spectrum light, similar to sunlight.

Therapy often involves sitting for 30 to 60 minutes a few feet from the light box first thing each morning. Daily light therapy often shows results in a few days or weeks, but should be continued until spring when sunlight increases.

In addition to light therapy, a doctor might prescribe an antidepressant. Psychotherapy can also help people learn ways of coping, Singh said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more on SAD.