19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace

 

 

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Worry Less for Better HealthCan the Bacteria in Your Belly Ease Your Worrying Mind?AHA News: Need a Break? A Vacation Really Can Be Good for You -- If It's Done RightHealthy Food May Boost MoodAre DIY Sunscreens Dangerous?Millennials Believe 'Narcissist' Label, But Don't Like ItMore Back-to-Back Heat Waves Will Come With Climate ChangeBody Adapts, Recovers From Occasional 'Pigging Out,' Study FindsCBD -- It's Everywhere, But Does It Work?Stay Safe While Spring CleaningCover Up! Don't Soak Up Those Sun RaysWant to Save Money While Shopping? Leave Your Phone HomeThree Ways to Improve Focus and ConcentrationSunscreen Chemicals Enter Bloodstream at Potentially Unsafe Levels: StudyCould You Be Short on Vitamin B12?How to Tame Morning ChaosTailoring Exercise to Your AgeSchool Bullying's Impact Can Last a Lifetime: StudyWellness Programs Take Hold in American WorkplacesAmericans Sitting More Than Ever, and Tech Is to BlameVeggies, Fruits and Grains Keep Your Heart PumpingSkipping Breakfast Could Be a Bad Move for Your HeartMany 'Gen Xers' Desolate as They Navigate Adulthood: StudyHow to Make Your Workplace a Healthier OneEmbracing 'Oneness' Boosts Satisfaction With Life: StudyAre Workplace Wellness Programs Worth It?Common Sleep Myths Endanger Public HealthGet Back to Nature to Put Stress at BayScience Says: Smiling Does Bring a Mood BoostIs Your Smartphone Making You Fat?Those Whitening Strips May Damage Your TeethDietary Supplements Do Nothing for You: StudyVoice-Assisted Tech Can Be a Driving HazardWhen Using Moisturizers With Sunscreen, Don't Miss Around the EyesKindness: 12 Minutes to a Better MoodWhy Holding a Grudge Is Bad for Your HealthMove More, Live LongerDo You Live in One of America's 'Healthiest Communities'?A Good Spring Clean Can Help Tame Seasonal AllergiesAHA News: Culture, Paycheck, Neighborhood Key to Your Heart's HealthEye-Soothing Tips for Computer UsersWalk, Dance, Clean: Even a Little Activity Helps You Live LongerWhy Watch Sports? Fans Get a Self-Esteem Boost, Study Finds1 in 3 Young Adults Suffers From Loneliness in U.S.Time Change Tougher for Kids With Mental Health IssuesAHA News: Irregular Sleep Could Impact Your Heart HealthBeware of Drowsy Driving as Daylight Saving Time BeginsSleeping In on Weekends May Not Repay Your Sleep 'Debt'Health Tip: Travel Suggestions For Your EyesHow Color Can Help You De-Stress
VideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Smoking
Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

Is Your Smartphone Making You Fat?

HealthDay News
by By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Apr 11th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, April 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mindlessly switching from your smartphone to other media devices and back again might lead to added pounds, scientists say.

A small, new study found that heavy-duty media multitaskers also tended to be heavier, weight-wise.

It's possible that these devices are actually changing the brain, theorized lead author Richard Lopez, a postdoctoral fellow in psychology at Rice University in Houston. In terms of weight, that could mean less self-control when fattening foods are at hand.

For their study, Lopez and his colleagues had 132 students, aged 18 to 23, answer questions about how much they multitasked and how distractible they were. Certain questions -- such as, do you feel the urge to check your phone while you're talking to someone else? -- were designed to detect compulsive or inappropriate cellphone use.

The researchers found that study participants with higher scores on the questionnaire tended to weigh more than those with lower scores, suggesting a possible link between the two.

Next, Lopez's team had 72 of the students undergo an MRI brain scan while they were shown a serious of pictures. Images of delicious, fattening foods were mixed in with the images.

When the food images were viewed, activity increased in the part of the brain linked to food temptation, the findings showed. These participants, who also tended to have more body fat, spent more time at campus cafeterias, the researchers said.

Of course the study cannot prove that multitasking makes a person fat, only that there seems to be an association. But Lopez believes the findings suggest a link between multitasking and obesity risk -- the connection being the part of the brain that responds to temptation.

Noting that smartphones and tablets have only been around for about a decade, Lopez said it's too soon to understand all the repercussions.

"We don't know what the effects all these behaviors are having on how we respond to other aspects of our environment," he said.

In future research, Lopez' team hopes to learn if people with poor self-control are easily distracted by multimedia, or whether it's that people who multitask electronically are likely to lose self-control over time.

At this point, "being mindful of multitasking is advisable," Lopez said. "Being mindlessly pulled in different directions by these different devices is probably not good for us cognitively, and it may have effects on other behaviors."

One expert said the study offers food for thought.

"What this study can't tell us is what's cause and what's effect," said Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University's Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center.

Do the same neurological predispositions favor media multitasking and overeating, Katz said, or does the activity alter the brain and foster obesity directly?

"This study raises concerns about the association, and invites us to ask more questions about the connection and answer them in subsequent studies," Katz said.

"We have likely all heard that distracted eating is a peril for overeating, making bad choices and weight gain," he added.

Eating more mindfully is a way of curbing temptation to eat too much or too many fattening foods, Katz believes.

The report was recently published online in the journal Brain Imaging and Behavior.

More information

For more on obesity, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.