19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace

 

 

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Do You Know Your Cardiorespiratory Fitness Level?Are You an 'Extreme Early Bird'?Unplugging From Social Media on Vacation? It's Tough at FirstHow to Kickstart Your CreativityWhat TV Binge-Watching Does to Your BrainGiving Up Meat Could Help Your Health -- And the Planet'sHeart-Healthy Habits Good For Your BrainFast-Food Joints on Your Way to Work? Your Waistline May WidenPlants on Your Plate Will Protect Your Heart3 Ways to Improve Your Eating Habits4 Tips for a Healthier Home4 Personal Items You Probably Should Replace TodayTrees an Oasis of Mental Well-BeingSome Meds and Driving a Dangerous DuoAmericans Are Spending Even More Time Sitting, Study ShowsCan Your Smartphone Make You Fat?Dirty Air Kills 30,000 Americans Each YearWarm Bath Can Send You Off to a Sound Slumber, Study FindsAHA News: Exercise Caution Outdoors in the Summer HeatSunglasses a Shield for the EyesToo Much Smartphone Time May Invite Host of Health WoesThe Happiness Dividend: Longer, Healthier LivesSummer Can Be Hard on Your HearingJust 300 Fewer Calories a Day Brings a Health BenefitCan a Budget Make You Happier?Sleep : The Right Prescription for Your HealthIs Your Mattress Releasing Toxins While You Sleep?Ageism Disappears When Young and Old Spend Time TogetherHow Protect Against Short- and Long-Term Sun DamageHealth Tip: Wear Sunglasses With UV ProtectionHow Are You Feeling? Check Your WristbandSelfie Craze Has Young Americans Viewing Plastic Surgery More Favorably: StudyWhat Are the Most Dangerous Food Groups?How to Move Past Life's Inevitable Speed BumpsTV Watching May Be Most Unhealthy Type of Sitting: StudyJust How Harmful Is TV for Your Health?How Does Your Diet Stack Up?The Health Benefits of Sleeping on Your SideHow Much Work Brings Happiness? Not Much, Study Shows2 Hours/Week in Nature: Your Prescription for Better Health?Eating More Red Meat May Shorten Your LifeScared Safe: Pics of Sun's Damage to Face Boost Sunscreen UseFoods May Taste Better If You're SittingShould Air Quality Checks Be Part of Your Travel Planning?Guard Your Skin Against the Summer SunGetting Your Nutrients: From the Source or Supplements?Human Endurance May Have Its Limits: StudyThe Dangers of Being a People-PleaserFinancial Disaster May Prompt Self-Destructive BehaviorHow Much Coffee Is Too Much?
VideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Smoking
Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

Could You Be Short on Vitamin B12?

HealthDay News
by By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: May 2nd 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In the ABCs of vitamins, B12 is often overlooked. But it's essential for the making of nerve and red blood cells, as well as DNA along with many other body processes. Adults and teens need just 2.4 micrograms a day, but you can fall short even on this small amount.

You're at particular risk of a B12 deficiency if you're a vegetarian because animal foods, like meat and dairy, are the only foods that deliver it. If you have a health problem that affects nutrient absorption, like Crohn's disease, have had bariatric surgery or take certain medications, you also run the risk. So do people over 50 because of changes in stomach acids.

Common medications that can affect your body's B12 levels:

  • PPIs such as omeprazole (Prilosec) and lansoprazole (Prevacid), used for treating heartburn or GERD.
  • H2 receptor antagonists such as famotidine (Pepcid) and ranitidine (Zantac), also used for treating those and other conditions.
  • Metformin, the diabetes drug.

A deficiency can develop slowly over time or come on rather fast. Possible warning signs include emotional or thinking problems, fatigue, weakness, weight loss, constipation, and numbness or tingling in hands and feet. These can also be symptoms of many other conditions, but it takes only a blood test to diagnose a B12 deficiency.

If you don't eat animal-based foods, you can boost B12 with fortified soy foods or grain products like cereal. And unless the deficiency is severe, you'll get enough through a multivitamin supplement. When the deficiency is more serious, your doctor might give you a B12 shot to bring your level up to normal.

Be certain that the doctor who prescribes B12 supplementation for you is aware of any medications you're taking to avoid negative interactions.

More information

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has more on vitamin B12, how much you need by age and best sources.