19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace

 

 

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Aging & Geriatrics
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
AHA News: Tiring Easily May Warn of Future Heart TroubleTight Blood Pressure Control Could Help Save Aging BrainsToo Much Napping May Signal Alzheimer'sHealth Tip: Fatigue in Older AdultsHeart-Healthy Habits Good For Your BrainDespite Cancer Screening, 'Oldest Old' Have Low Survival Odds: StudyStay Social to Help Cut Your Odds of DementiaFrailty Not a Normal Part of AgingAnemia Linked to Higher Odds for Dementia in SeniorsIt's Not Just College Kids: Many Seniors Are Binge Drinking, TooMiddle Age Now a High-Risk Time for Bad FallsCould Extra Weight Weaken Your Brain?At Risk for Alzheimer's? Exercise Might Help Keep It at BayHealthy Living Can Cut Odds for Alzheimer's in People at Genetic RiskMore Evidence That Socializing Helps Protect the Aging BrainCould Computers, Crafts Help Preserve the Aging Brain?Ageism Disappears When Young and Old Spend Time TogetherMeals on Wheels Delivers an Extra Health Bonus for SeniorsSurvey Urges Grandparents to Lock Down Their Meds When Kids Visit3 Moves for Better BalanceForget the Past: Get Moving Now and Live LongerLonely Baby Boomers Driving Surge in Plastic SurgeryHealth Tip: Preventing GlaucomaEducation, Intelligence Might Protect Your BrainBones Help Black People Keep Facial Aging at BayCould You Afford Home Health Care? New Study Says Maybe NotFor Some, Trouble Tracking Finances Could Be Sign of DementiaFalls Are Increasingly Lethal for Older AmericansMany Middle-Aged Men May Have Signs of Thinning BonesThough 'Donut Hole' Is Shrinking, Medicare Drug Costs Are Rising: StudySenior Falls a Key Factor for Hospital ReadmissionRising Rx Drug Costs Continue to Create Tough Choices for SeniorsTake a New View of AgingThe Best Exercises for Brain HealthSudoku, Crosswords Could Make Your Brain Years YoungerHuhn? Scientists Working on Hearing Aid That Solves the 'Cocktail Party' ProblemBrain Bleed Risk Puts Safety of Low-Dose Aspirin in DoubtHealth Tip: Wellness for Older Adults'Robopets' Bring Companionship, Calm to Nursing Home ResidentsPotentially Blinding Shingles of the Eye on the RiseAnger a Threat to Health in Old AgeMorning Exercise Kick-Starts Seniors' BrainsHow Does Age Affect Creativity? Nobel Prize Winners Offer CluesMost U.S. Middle-Class Seniors Will Lack Funds for Assisted Living by 2029Health Tip: Improving Your MemoryEven a Little More Exercise Might Help Your Brain Stay YoungCan't Work Out During the Week? 'Weekend Warriors' Still BenefitAHA News: Here's How Middle-Aged People -- Especially Women -- Can Avoid a Heart AttackFinancial Scammers Often Prey on People With Early DementiaPros, Cons to Multiple Meds for Nursing Home Residents
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Elder Care

Falls Are Increasingly Lethal for Older Americans

HealthDay News
by By Steven ReinbergHealthDay Reporter
Updated: Jun 4th 2019

new article illustration

TUESDAY, June 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Deaths from falls are increasing sharply among elderly Americans, a new study finds.

Nearly 25,000 people 75 and older died as a result of falls in 2016 -- almost three times as many as in 2000. And experts warn that the toll is likely to rise along with population shifts.

"As the United States population continues to age, we can expect more deaths from falls," said researcher Robin Lee, an epidemiologist at the Injury Center of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We can also expect more hospitalizations and nursing home admissions as a result of falls."

An estimated $50 billion was spent on medical care related to falls in 2015, Lee said.

For both men and women, the death rate due to falls per 100,000 people roughly doubled between 2000 and 2016, according to the study.

For men, the rate rose from about 61 per 100,000 to 116. Among women, the death rate jumped from 46 to 106 per 100,000.

Not surprisingly, the danger rose as people got older, Lee's team confirmed.

In 2016, for example, the death rate due to falls among 75- to 79-year-olds was 42 per 100,000. Among those 95 and older, the rate was 591 per 100,000.

Exactly why these rates are rising isn't really clear, researchers said. What is clear, they emphasized, is that falls don't have to happen in the first place.

"Caregivers should know that falls are preventable, and they can encourage their loved ones to speak to their doctor about their fall risk," Lee said.

The report was published June 4 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Another study in the same issue tested a home-based exercise program aimed at helping seniors prevent falls.

That study was led by Teresa Liu-Ambrose of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Her team found that the program -- in which a physical therapist visits the home and provides strength and balance retraining exercises -- reduced falls over 12 months by 36%.

"By reducing the rate of falls, we may be prolonging the ability of these older adults to be independent living and functional," Liu-Ambrose said.

Dr. Marco Pahor, director of the Institute of Aging at the University of Florida in Gainesville, wrote an editorial accompanying the studies. While he attributed the increasing rate of fatal falls to the nation's advancing age, he emphasized that age is only one factor that increases seniors' fall risk.

Other factors include a sedentary lifestyle, chronic diseases, neurologic issues and incontinence, as well as higher use of prescription drugs. All can cause problems with gait and balance that can result in potentially catastrophic and life-threatening falls, Pahor pointed out.

"People can die after a fall for many reasons, which may include head trauma, internal bleeding and complications of a bone fracture," he said. "Fractures can lead to hospitalization, immobility in bed and respiratory or other infections, which can be fatal."

Several steps can be taken to reduce the risk, Pahor said. These include weight-bearing exercise, such as walking, balance training and resistance exercises to strengthen muscles. Preventing and treating osteoporosis is also important.

He said caregivers should review medications that can cause low blood pressure or loss of balance, get seniors' vision problems corrected, make sure they wear safe footwear and take steps to make their homes safer.

Home visits by a physical therapist may be the most practical approach for people who have mobility or transportation problems, Pahor added.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers more about falls among older adults.