19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace

 

 

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Severe Deprivation in Childhood Has Lasting Impact on Brain SizeHealth Tip: What Your Child Can do About BullyingWildfires Send Kids to ERs for Breathing ProblemsTV Can Be a Good Influence on Kids' Eating HabitsWould Tighter Swimming Rules at Public Beaches, Lakes and Rivers Save Lives?U.S. Doctors Often Test, Treat Kids UnnecessarilyHealth Tip: Safety Steps if Your Child is Home AloneHealth Tip: Help Your Child Safely Lose WeightAmericans Need to Tackle Youth Obesity: U.S. Task ForceGenes, Family Are Key Predictors of School SuccessKids' 'Microbiome' May Play Key Role in AsthmaA Puppy in Santa's Sack? Probably Not, Say ParentsMore Kids, Teens Landing in ERs After Opioid OverdosesGetting Active Helps Kids' Hearts, Even in the ObeseWhen Does Your Child's Flu Merit an ER Visit?Health Tip: Managing Hearing Loss in ChildrenHealth Tip: Is My Child Too Sick to Go to School?Differences Found in Brains of Kids Born to Depressed ParentsSecondhand Smoke Starts Kids on Path to Heart Disease: StudyHealth Tip: Choosing a PediatricianMany Kids Traveling Overseas Aren't Vaccinated Against MeaslesCould Obesity Alter a Child's Brain Structure?Dramatic Rise in Eye Injuries From BB and Paintball GunsTwo-Thirds of Child Abuse Survivors Do Well as AdultsAHA News: Serious Heart Defects Increase Heart Failure Risk in Early AdulthoodMore U.S. Kids Are Shunning Sweetened DrinksAs Disease Outbreaks Tied to 'Anti-Vaxxers' Rise, States Take Action'Don't Give Up:' Parents' Intuition Spots a Rare Illness Before Doctors DoFDA Approves First Contact Lens That Slows Myopia ProgressionStereotypes About Girls and Math Don't Add Up, Scans ShowStudies Confirm HPV Shot Is SafeThese Sports Are Most Likely to Send Young Americans to the ERNature Nurtures KidsClimate Change Will Hurt Kids Most, Report WarnsTough Childhoods Can Leave a Lifetime of Harm, Experts SayMany U.S. Parents Can't Find a Psychiatrist to Help Their ChildAnti-Vaxxers Find Ways Around States' 'Personal Exemption' BansMake a Plan for Gardening Next Spring With Your KidsCheck Those Halloween Treats So They're Safe to EatFast-Food Outlet in Neighborhood Could Mean Heavier Kids: StudyAntihistamines Linked to Delayed Care for Severe Allergic Reaction: StudyPain Twice as Common for Kids With Autism: StudyPediatricians' Group Calls for More Research on Artificial SweetenersExperts Support Weight-Loss Surgery for Very Obese KidsHalloween Can Be Frightful for Kids With Allergies, AsthmaLawn Mowers May Be Even More Dangerous for Rural KidsHow Young Is Too Young to Leave Kids Home Alone?Skiing, Snowboarding Injuries Most Severe Among Younger KidsKids' Trampoline Injuries Take Another Bounce UpwardsCan More Exercise Improve Thinking Skills in Cancer Survivors?
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting

Chickenpox Vaccine Shields Kids From Shingles, Too

HealthDay News
by By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Jun 10th 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, June 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Shingles isn't usually considered a kids' disease, but children can get this painful condition. Fortunately, the chickenpox vaccine can also protect them against it, a new study finds.

"The virus that causes chickenpox also causes shingles. It's pretty uncommon in kids, but we wanted to see what would happen to the rates of shingles among children over time as more kids received the vaccine," said study lead author Sheila Weinmann. She's a senior investigator and epidemiologist at Kaiser Permanente Northwest in Portland, Ore.

What the researchers found was that kids who were vaccinated against chickenpox had a 78% lower risk of developing shingles. And the rate of shingles dropped in the entire group -- vaccinated and unvaccinated -- by 72% between 2003 and 2014.

Weinmann said the overall drop was large because so much less of the virus was circulating in the general population.

The study was published online June 10 in Pediatrics.

Dr. Anne Gershon from Columbia University wrote a companion editorial that argued all children should get the vaccine for the dual protection it offers.

"The vaccine is not only highly protective against chickenpox, but it protects against shingles as well," she said. "Now we have to find out how long the protection will last."

The chickenpox vaccine is also known as the varicella vaccine because varicella zoster is the virus that causes the disease. The vaccine was introduced to the United States in 1996, when one dose was recommended for 12- to 18-month-olds to protect them against chickenpox, according to background information in the study.

Since 2007, a booster at 4 and 6 years of age also has been recommended.

Dr. David Fagan, vice chair of pediatrics at Cohen Children's Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y., said shingles isn't usually severe in children, unless their immune system is compromised. He wasn't involved in the current study, but is familiar with the findings.

Shingles (herpes zoster) usually develops in much older people who had chickenpox as kids. After a chickenpox infection, the virus lays dormant until something triggers it to reactivate. It's much more common in people after age 60, Gershon said. "As you get older, the immune system gets tired," she explained.

To see how varicella vaccine would affect the rate of shingles in kids, the researchers collected health information on 6.4 million children, ages 1 to 17. More than 14,300 developed shingles during the 12-year study period.

Overall, about half had received the chickenpox vaccine. In 2003, the vaccination rate varied from 27% to 52%. By 2014, it ranged from 82% to 91%, the study said.

Weinmann said it's not clear how long the protection against shingles will last. But over the study period, the rate of shingles cases kept declining, which may be a hopeful sign for longer protection. Still, Weinmann stressed it's too soon to know.

"The clear take home-message from this study is that the incidence of zoster in children who were immunized against chickenpox was 78% lower. So varicella vaccine prevents not only varicella, but zoster," Fagan said.

And what will happen to these children decades later, after they reach 60? Will the chickenpox vaccine have any effect on older people who have a greater risk of shingles?

Both Weinmann and Gershon said that's unknown. Until more study is done, both said there are two vaccines -- Zostavax and Shingrix -- available for middle-aged adults to prevent shingles.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers more details about the chickenpox vaccine.