19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace.

SCAMHC serves all individuals regardless of inability to pay. Discounts for essential services are offered based on family size and income. For more information, contact (334) 222-2523 or our 24/7 Helpline at 1-877-530-0002.

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Alzheimers Disease and other Cognitive Disorders
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction & Causes of Cognitive DisordersDementiaAlzheimer's DiseaseOther Cognitive DisordersDementia Coping Skills & Behavior ManagementTraumatic Brain Injury (TBI)Conclusion and Resources
More InformationLatest News
Aphasia Affects Brain Similar to Alzheimer's, But Without Memory LossCaregivers Feeling the Strain This Tough Holiday SeasonYears Before Diagnosis, People With Alzheimer's Lose Financial AcumenCould Dirty Air Help Speed Alzheimer's?Strong Sleeping Pills Tied to Falls, Fractures in Dementia PatientsAnxiety Might Speed Alzheimer's: StudyPre-Op 'Brain Games' Might Prevent Post-Op DeliriumDoes Hard Work Help Preserve the Brain?Staying Active as You Age Not a Guarantee Against DementiaSmog Tied to Raised Risk for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's DiseasePoor Brain Blood Flow Might Spur 'Tangles' of Alzheimer'sIs Apathy an Early Sign of Dementia?A-Fib Treatment Reduces Patients' Dementia RiskFall Risk Rises Even in Alzheimer's Early StagesPTSD May Be Tied to Greater Dementia RiskNew Research Links Another Gene to Alzheimer's RiskIs Rural Appalachia a Hotspot for Alzheimer's?Why Are Dementia Patients Getting Risky Psychiatric Drugs?Get Dizzy When Standing Up? It Could Be Risk Factor for DementiaCan Seniors Handle Results of Alzheimer's Risk Tests?More Education May Slow Start of Early-Onset Alzheimer'sUnder 50 and Overweight? Your Odds for Dementia Later May RiseBlood Test Heralds New Era in Alzheimer's Diagnosis9/11 First Responders Have Higher Odds for Alzheimer's: StudyCould the Flu Shot Lower Your Risk for Alzheimer's?Will Your Brain Stay Sharp Into Your 90s? Certain Factors Are KeyResearchers Zero in on Alzheimer's Disease Risk FactorsMany Americans With Dementia Live in Homes With GunsBrain's Iron Stores May Be Key to Alzheimer'sHormones May Explain Greater Prevalence of Alzheimer's in WomenMiddle-Age Obesity Linked to Higher Odds for DementiaCould Crohn's, Colitis Raise Dementia Risk?5 Healthy Steps to Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer'sCOVID-19 Brings New Challenges to Alzheimer's CaregivingAlzheimer's Gene Linked to Severe COVID-19 RiskHealthier Heart, Better Brain in Old AgeAHA News: Hearing Loss and the Connection to Alzheimer's Disease, DementiaBrain Plaques Signal Alzheimer's Even Before Other Symptoms Emerge: StudyCertain Gene Might Help Shield At-Risk People From Alzheimer'sHow to Connect With Nursing Home Patients in QuarantineHow to Ease Loved Ones With Alzheimer's Through the PandemicCaring for Dementia Patient During Pandemic? Try These Stress-Busting TipsDirty Air Might Raise Your Odds for DementiaRecovery From Mild Brain Trauma Takes Longer Than Expected: StudyCould Sleep Apnea Put You at Risk for Alzheimer's?Daily Aspirin Won't Stop Dementia, Study FindsStudy Ties Brain Inflammation to Several Types of DementiaHeart Drug Combos Might Also Lower Your Dementia Risk: StudyU.S. Primary Care Docs Unprepared for Surge in Alzheimer's CasesMaria Shriver Sounds the Alarm on Women and Alzheimer's
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Aging & Geriatrics
Memory Problems
Elder Care

Gene Variant Ups Dementia Risk in Parkinson's Patients: Study

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Feb 6th 2020

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Feb. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic variant associated with Alzheimer's disease increases the risk of dementia in people with Parkinson's disease, researchers say.

The finding could lead to new treatments for dementia in Parkinson's patients, according to the team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurological disorder that causes tremors, stiffness, slow movement and impaired balance.

Eighty percent of patients diagnosed with Parkinson's develop dementia within 20 years. Those who carry a particular variant of the gene APOE have an especially high risk, the study authors said.

The researchers found that Parkinson's-related proteins spread more rapidly through the brains of mice with the high-risk APOE4 variant, and that memory and thinking skills decline faster in Parkinson's patients who have the variant.

APOE4 is known to increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease by three to five times.

The study was published Feb. 5 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

"Dementia takes a huge toll on people with Parkinson's and their caregivers," said lead author Dr. Albert Davis, an assistant professor of neurology. "The development of dementia is often what determines whether someone with Parkinson's is able to remain in their home or has to go into a nursing home."

These findings could lead to therapies that target APOE to slow or prevent mental decline in people with Parkinson's, the study authors said in a university news release.

About 930,000 people in the United States have Parkinson's disease, which is believed to be caused by a buildup of toxic proteins called alpha-synuclein in a brain area involved in movement. The protein clumps damage and can kill brain cells.

"Parkinson's is the most common, but there are other, rarer diseases that also are caused by alpha-synuclein aggregation and also have very limited treatment options," Davis said. "Targeting APOE with therapeutics might be a way to change the course of such diseases."

Davis noted that APOE doesn't affect the overall risk of developing Parkinson's or its progression, so an APOE-targeted therapy might slow or prevent dementia without improving movement problems. Even so, such therapy could be beneficial, he suggested.

"Once people with Parkinson's develop dementia, the financial and emotional costs to them and their families are just enormous," Davis said. "If we can reduce their risk of dementia, we could dramatically improve their quality of life."

More information

The Parkinson's Foundation has more on Parkinson's disease.