19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace

 

 

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Women's Health
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Exercise Might Make Breast Milk's Goodness Even BetterPreterm Birth Ups Mom's Long-Term Heart Disease Risk: StudyAffection, at Least for Women, May Be Rooted in GenesHormones May Explain Greater Prevalence of Alzheimer's in WomenCoronavirus Delivering a Big Economic Blow to WomenAHA News: Persistent Depression Might Increase Heart Disease Risk for Women With HIVStatins Tied to Significantly Lower Death Rate From Ovarian CancerPandemic Affecting Mental Health of Pregnant Women, New MomsClimate Change, Smog Could Mean More Preemie Babies: StudyFemale Athletes Shortchange Themselves on NutritionWomen Still Left Out of Much Medical ResearchAHA News: Pregnant Women With Heart Defects Don't Always Get This Recommended TestNot a Myth -- Contraceptives Can Cause Weight GainMeds Like Valium, Xanax Linked to Higher Risk of Ectopic PregnancyAt-Home Gene Test for Breast, Ovarian Cancers Looks EffectivePlacenta's Hidden Mysteries Revealed in MRI StudyLost Pregnancies, Diabetes May Be LinkedWomen Less Likely to Get Standard Heart MedicationsGood News for Menopausal Women Who Take HopsBlack and White Women Share the Same Genetic Risk for Breast Cancer'Good Bacteria' Might Help Fight a Common Gynecologic InfectionMore Evidence Sugary Drinks Harm Women's HeartsAHA News: Prenatal Supplement May Increase Blood Pressure at High DosesMammograms Do Save Women's Lives, Study FindsBreastfeeding May Help Guard Against DiabetesAHA News: How Pregnant Woman's High Blood Pressure Can Change Shape of Baby's HeartMenopause May Someday Disappear as Women Postpone Pregnancy: StudyRural Women at Higher Risk of Early Death From Heart DiseaseEven During Pandemic, Childbirth Safest in Hospital, Doctors' Group SaysDo C-Section Babies Become Heavier Adults?High-Fiber Diets May Lower Odds for Breast CancerWomen in Their 50s Can Lower Their Stroke Risk – Here's HowMental Health Problems After First Baby Reduce Likelihood of More Children: StudyWhen Arteries Narrow, Chest Pain Can Come Earlier for Women Than MenRacial, Ethnic Gaps in Insurance Put Moms, Babies at Risk: StudyStatins Might Reduce Harms From Breast Cancer ChemoExpectant Moms: Take Care and Don't Panic About CoronavirusGene Tests May Guard Older Breast Cancer Patients Against Other TumorsAHA News: Changing the Way We View Women's Heart Attack SymptomsMaria Shriver Sounds the Alarm on Women and Alzheimer'sAHA News: Estrogen Therapy in Early Menopause May Help Keep Arteries ClearDon't Wait, for Your Baby's Sake: Quit Smoking Before You're PregnantFemale Firefighters Face Higher Exposure to CarcinogensNew Moms Need to Watch Out for High Blood PressureBad Sleep, Bad Diet = Bad Heart?A Woman's Guide to Skin Care During and After MenopauseAHA News: What Women Need to Know About Breast Cancer and Heart DiseaseIs High Blood Pressure in First Pregnancy a Harbinger of Heart Trouble?AHA News: Domestic Abuse May Do Long-Term Damage to Women's Health'Couch Potato' Lifestyle Poses Danger to Women's Hearts
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Wellness and Personal Development
Mental Disorders

High-Fiber Diets May Lower Odds for Breast Cancer

HealthDay News
by By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Apr 10th 2020

new article illustration

FRIDAY, April 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Whether she gets it from fruits, beans, grains or vegetables, dietary fiber appears to at least slightly lower a woman's risk for breast cancer, a comprehensive new review finds.

The review covered data from 20 different trials involving millions of women. It found that high levels of total fiber consumption "was associated with an 8% lower risk of breast cancer," compared to low consumption.

The studies only included prospective trials, where a trial is set up and results tabulated as time goes on. Prospective trials are thought to have more validity than retrospective diet/cancer studies, which only ask women what they ate in the past.

The new study is the first such data review involving prospective studies, said a team led by Maryam Farvid of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston.

Beyond the overall reduction in risk, the review also found the anti-cancer benefit of fiber extended to women of all ages.

"A high intake of total fiber also was found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk in both premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancers," Farvid's group noted.

One breast cancer specialist was encouraged by the findings.

"With the risk for breast cancer being as significant as it is, we are always looking for ways in which we can decrease a woman's risk for developing this disease," said Dr. Lauren Cassell, chief of breast surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

As to how fiber works its magic, Cassell said that "it is presumed that consumption of total fiber aids in decreasing circulating insulin and growth factors, as well as decreasing estrogen levels, which are [all] known to aid in the development of breast cancers."

The Boston team noted that American women typically get close to half (45%) of their dietary fiber from whole grains and cereals, with vegetables being the source of about 23% of fiber, and the rest divided between fruits, nuts, beans and seeds.

But the study found it didn't really matter where the dietary fiber came from: "The reduction in risk appears to be similar for intake of all sources of fiber," Farvid's group said.

High daily fiber intake also appeared to have similar benefits for various subtypes of breast cancer, the study found.

"The current study findings support the American Cancer Society dietary guidelines to consume foods rich in total fiber, including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains," the researchers reported.

Cassell seconded that notion.

"Even if there is only a modest risk reduction, adding all types of fiber to your diet, particularly fiber that comes from fruit, is easy and has many other added benefits to one's digestion and diet," she said.

The study was published online April 6 in the journal Cancer.

More information

For more about breast cancer, visit the American Cancer Society.