19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace.

SCAMHC serves all individuals regardless of inability to pay. Discounts for essential services are offered based on family size and income. For more information, contact (334) 222-2523 or our 24/7 Helpline at 1-877-530-0002.

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Climate Change Is Spurring Malnutrition in Kids WorldwideNew Year, New Tips for Keeping Your Kids Safe and HealthyAHA News: Pandemic Pods Offer Social Relief, But There Are RisksPediatricians' Group Says School Is Priority, With Proper Safety MeasuresKids With Congenital Heart Disease Face Higher Odds of Mental Health IssuesReady to Resume Sports?  Health Tips for Getting Back in the GameMasks Don't Mask Others' Emotions for KidsCould Going Vegetarian Lower Kids' Asthma Risk?Parents Feel the Strain as Pandemic Adds New Role: TeacherInvolved Dads Make a Difference for Disadvantaged TeensPoll Charts U.S. Parents' Biggest Worries During PandemicDo Genes Doom Some Kids to Obesity? Probably Not, Study FindsSchools, Day Care Not a Big Factor in Kids Getting COVID: StudyType 2 Diabetes in Youth Is Especially Unhealthy: StudyWhen Sepsis Strikes Children, Black Kids More Likely to Die: StudyNew Clues to Crohn's Disease in KidsKids With Dyslexia May Have Hidden StrengthsKids' Weight Rises When Convenience Stores Open Nearby: StudyA Better, Safer Way to Rid Some Kids of Seizures?More Clues to Why Kids Have Much Milder COVID-19Pandemic Causing Dangerous Delays in Care When Appendicitis Strikes KidsHow to Keep Kids Resilient in a Strange Holiday SeasonLockdowns May Be Keeping Kids' Asthma Attacks at Bay: StudyYoung Epilepsy Patients May Benefit From Mental Health ScreeningSudden Death More Common Than Thought in Very Young With EpilepsyCOVID in Kids: The Most Telling SymptomsPreemie Babies End Up Hospitalized More as KidsCommon Weight-Loss Surgery Can Weaken a Teen's BonesAnother Study Finds COVID Usually Mild in KidsParents' Age Key to Whether Kids Get Vaccinated Against COVID, Study FindsDoes Parents' Nagging Kids About Screen Time Even Matter?Which Kids With COVID Will Get Very Sick?Add Kids to COVID Vaccine Trials, Pediatricians' Group SaysToo Many Kids Still Get Antipsychotics They Don't NeedIs the Pandemic Harming Kids' Mental Health?Eczema More Common Among Black, Hispanic KidsTelemedicine Is Keeping Kids' Asthma Care on Track: StudyKids With Food Allergies Can Become Targets for BulliesHelp Young Athletes Keep Their Competitive Edge During PandemicAlmost 1 in 5 Parents Are 'Vaccine Hesitant,' Study FindsFor Rural Youth, Mental Health Care Can Be Tough to FindAre Healthy Kids Getting Too Many Heart Tests?Big Spike Seen in COVID Cases Among KidsAsymptomatic Kids With COVID-19 May Also Carry Less VirusLockdowns Can Widen Kids' Waistlines – Here's How to Curb ThatSocial Media 'Kid Influencers' Are Promoting Junk FoodsPoverty Might Raise Black Kids' Health Risks as Early as Age 5Losing Some TV Ads Might Reduce Childhood ObesityIt's Tough to Change the Minds of 'Vaccine-Hesitant' Parents, Study FindsStudy Probes Links in Asthma, Food Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting

AHA News: Traumatic Childhood Increases Lifelong Risk for Heart Disease, Early Death


HealthDay News
Updated: Apr 28th 2020

new article illustration

TUESDAY, April 28, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Exposure to trauma and other adverse experiences during childhood increases lifelong risk for cardiovascular disease and death, regardless of a person's health during young adulthood, new research shows.

The study, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, found children who experienced severe adversity – such as verbal, physical or emotional abuse or living with drug or alcohol abusers – were 50% more likely to develop cardiovascular disease later in life than those with low exposure to childhood trauma. Those with even moderate exposure were 60% more likely to die from any cause by middle adulthood.

This could be, researchers believe, because people who face severe adversity as children undergo a combination of behavioral and biological responses not yet fully understood. Previous research shows part of what happens is people are more likely to develop unhealthy coping mechanisms, such as smoking and poor eating habits, which contribute to traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such as high blood pressure, obesity, inflammation and diabetes.

But even after controlling for such risk factors, this long-term study found higher rates of heart disease and mortality in those who experienced childhood stress as they reached middle age compared to those who did not.

"Childhood trauma impacts your ability to appropriately handle stress," said lead investigator Jacob Pierce, a fourth-year medical student at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "What our analysis shows is that there are also other risk factors we did not account for that put these people at risk for cardiovascular outcomes later in life."

Pierce and his team analyzed data from 3,646 people in a study conducted from 1985 to 2018 in four cities: Birmingham, Alabama; Chicago; Minneapolis; and Oakland, California.

Participants were enrolled between the ages of 18 and 30 and followed for more than 30 years. The analysis found more than 20% experienced a high rate (four or more out of seven indicators) of exposure to damaging childhood events – and those participants had health troubles from young adulthood well on into middle age.

"The results of this study further confirm that cardiovascular disease is not simply a problem at older ages, but has its origins in childhood experiences," said Karestan C. Koenen, a professor at Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. She was not involved in the study.

"Some of the relation between childhood adversity and (cardiovascular disease) seems to be explained by traditional risk factors, but those don't explain the entire relationship or the relationship with mortality," Koenen said. She was on a committee that wrote a 2017 American Heart Association scientific statement about childhood adversity and heart health outcomes.

"It's a complex issue that can't be boiled down to one reason," Pierce said. Childhood is a critical period of development for the brain. Exposure to stress activates hormones in the brain, which also are associated with cardiovascular disease, an area of interest for future study, he said. "We really need to look at the biology. What are the mechanisms in the body that are putting these people at risk?"

In the meantime, better and broader approaches to the way we treat children faced with traumatic experiences could help, Koenen said.

"Despite overwhelming evidence that childhood adversity has negative effects on physical and mental health over the life course, preventing childhood adversity is left to pediatricians and others who work with children," she said. "The public health burden of childhood adversity in the U.S. is a social problem that cannot be placed on the shoulders of individual health providers, but must be tackled on a large scale."