19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace

 

 

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Kids Breaking Fewer Bones During Pandemic, But More Fractures Happening at HomeSimilar to Adults, Obesity Raises Kids' Odds for Severe COVID-19Are Food Allergies Under-Diagnosed in Poor Families?Stay-at-Home Orders Could Mean More Obese Kids: StudyWhere Are Kids Getting the Most 'Empty Calories'?AHA News: For Kids, a Pandemic of Stress Could Have Long-Term Consequences6 Expert Tips for Defusing Kids' Quarantine MeltdownsFor Many Kids, Picky Eating Isn't Just a Phase, Study FindsSure-Fire Solutions for Managing Lockdown Temper TantrumsKeeping Kids Slim, Fit During Lockdown Isn't Easy: Here Are Some TipsCOVID-19 Antibodies May Tame Inflammatory Condition in Kids: StudyCould Certain Chemicals Trigger Celiac Disease?Italian Doctors Detail Cases of Inflammatory Condition in Kids With COVID-19AHA News: Is Your Child's Blood Pressure Something to Worry About?Zika Virus Tied to Profound Developmental DelaysCOVID-19 Still Rare in Kids, But Far From Harmless: StudyKids' ER Visits for Mental Health Problems Soared Over 10 YearsTo Prevent Injuries, Give Your Kids a Pass on Cutting the GrassFewer Kids in Cancer Trials, Which Might Not Be a Bad ThingLoving Family May Lower Future Depression Risk in KidsBest Ways to Help Kids Through the PandemicIn Rare Cases, COVID-19 May Be Causing Severe Heart Condition in KidsReplace That Old Carpet to Shield Your Kids From ToxinsCoronavirus Crisis Has Fewer Kids Getting Needed VaccinesAHA News: Traumatic Childhood Increases Lifelong Risk for Heart Disease, Early DeathFDA Bans Products That Help Kids Hide Vape Use From ParentsCalm Parenting Will Help Children Through Coronavirus PandemicStudy Confirms Safety, Effectiveness of Children's VaccinesUp to 50,000 U.S. Kids May Be Hospitalized With COVID-19 by Year's EndAre Immune-Compromised Kids at Greater Risk From COVID-19?All That Social Media Hasn't Hurt Kids' Social Skills, Study FindsKids of Mentally Ill Parents Have Higher Injury OddsSchool Closures Could Be Adding to Kids' WaistlinesU.S. Study Finds COVID-19 Seldom Severe in KidsWhy Your Kids' Playground Is Unsafe During COVID-19 PandemicSchool Closures Will Force Many U.S. Health Care Workers to Stay HomeGoing Easy on Yourself Is Key to Parenting Through the PandemicParents, Arm Your Kids Against COVID-19 With Good Hand-Washing HabitsToo Little Sleep Takes Toll on Kids' Mental Health: StudyU.S. Kids, Teens Eating Better But Nutrition Gaps PersistHow to Keep Housebound Kids Busy During a PandemicCalming Your Child's Coronavirus FearsAnother Study Finds COVID-19 Typically Mild for KidsSoap vs. Coronavirus: Best Hand-Washing Tips for You and Your KidsKids Get Mild COVID-19 Symptoms, But Chance of Transmission High: StudyWhen Chronic Pain Leads to Depression in KidsPost-Game Snacks May Undo Calorie-Burning Benefit of Kids' SportsPick Summer Camps Carefully When Your Kid Has Allergies, AsthmaKids Raised by Grandparents More Likely to Pile on Pounds: StudyKeep Your Kids Safe, Warm in Wintertime Fun
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting

In Rare Cases, COVID-19 May Be Causing Severe Heart Condition in Kids

HealthDay News
by By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Apr 29th 2020

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Children don't typically fall seriously ill from the new coronavirus, but doctors are raising the alarm that some kids with COVID-19 infections in Europe have developed Kawasaki disease, a condition that can trigger serious heart problems.

Children in the United States aren't immune to this complication, experts say.

Dr. Michael Portman is director of the Kawasaki Disease Patient Program at Seattle Children's Hospital. He said, "The problem is that the symptoms of COVID-19 and Kawasaki disease overlap, and we're worried that parents of kids who have a fever may not want to bring them into the hospital for fear of COVID, but it could be Kawasaki disease and it won't get treated."

In addition, he explained that parents of children diagnosed with COVID-19 may not worry much about a fever if other symptoms aren't obvious, but "in children, COVID may be triggering an inflammatory response that doctors would call Kawasaki disease," Portman explained.

He said he's heard scattered reports of Kawasaki disease in children in the United States, as well as more cases in Europe.

The Paediatric Intensive Care Society (PICS) in the United Kingdom issued an urgent alert this week to warn doctors who care for critically ill patients with COVID-19 that National Health Service (NHS) England reported a small increase in the number of patients who also seem to have Kawasaki disease. Patients with both conditions might have heart inflammation and other serious heart issues.

However, the advisory also tried to reassure parents. "If you are a parent, please be assured that serious illness as a result of COVID-19 still appears to be a very rare event in children," the PICS statement said.

So, what symptoms should parents keep an eye out for?

The most telling symptom is a very high fever for five days. The fever is typically at least 101 degrees Fahrenheit, but can be 104 degrees F or higher, according to the American Heart Association. Portman said the fever might come and go during that time, but if your child has a high fever for four or five days, they should be evaluated by a doctor.

"Always call a pediatrician for a lasting fever," Portman said.

Other common symptoms of Kawasaki disease, according to the American Heart Association, include:

  • Rash, which may appear on back, chest or abdomen
  • Red, irritated eyes
  • Swollen hands or feet, which may also be red
  • Swelling or changes around the mouth
  • Swollen lymph glands in the neck
  • Abdominal pain or other digestive system symptoms

Portman said Kawasaki disease typically affects kids aged 5 and under, though it can occur in children of all ages. Portman said it affects about 20 children per every 100,000 in the United States each year.

The exact cause of Kawasaki disease is unknown, Portman said. But doctors believe that a virus or bacteria triggers inflammation and an immune system overreaction. A similar process, triggering massive inflammation, can also occur in some patients with COVID-19, he explained.

If identified in time, Kawasaki disease can often be effectively (though expensively) treated, Portman said. Left untreated, Kawasaki disease can lead to a coronary artery aneurysm -- that means there is a weak, bulging spot in the major blood vessel that delivers blood to your heart.

Pediatric infectious disease specialist Dr. Tina Tan, from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, told CNN that the NHS England alert was information the United States needed to know.

"I think it's really important that an alert like that goes out, not to alarm anybody but to have people be aware of the fact that this can happen. There have been an increased number of cases like this reported in Italy as well as Spain. Here in the U.S., I think we're just starting to see it," Tan said.

Only some of the affected youngsters tested positive for COVID-19, so it's not clear yet how -- or even if -- the two conditions are connected.

In addition to the United Kingdom, Italy and Spain, the Associated Press noted that possible cases of COVID-19 and Kawasaki disease may have occurred in Belgium and France.

More information

Learn more about Kawasaki disease from the Vasculitis Foundation.