19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace.

SCAMHC serves all individuals regardless of inability to pay. Discounts for essential services are offered based on family size and income. For more information, contact (334) 222-2523 or our 24/7 Helpline at 1-877-530-0002.

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction and Types of Depressive DisordersRelated Disorders / ConditionsHistorical and Current UnderstandingsBiology, Psychology and SociologyTreatment - Medication and PsychotherapyAlternative Medicine and Self-Help ResourcesSpecial IssuesReferences
More InformationTestsLatest News
Common Antidepressants Won't Raise Risk for Bleeding Strokes: StudyFeeling SAD? Here Are Ways to Ease Winter BluesTreating Mom's Postpartum Depression Could Help Baby's Brain, TooDepression in Youth Ups Odds for Adult Illnesses: StudyToo Much Social Media Time Could Raise Risk of DepressionAHA News: Certain Antidepressants Might Increase Stroke Risk for Young Adults With PTSDCOVID Fuels Depression Among Pregnant Women, New Moms'Body Issues' Raise Depression Risks for TeensCoping With Lockdown Loneliness During the HolidaysAHA News: People With Depression Fare Worse in Heart Health StudyTwo Key Lifestyle Factors May Ward Off DepressionBirth Control Pill Won't Raise Depression RiskDepression Has Strong Ties to Stroke, Study FindsFor Some Women, Postpartum Depression Lingers for YearsSevere Morning Sickness Linked to Depression Before and After BirthDepressed Teens May Struggle in SchoolMore Are Turning to Pot When Depressed – But Does It Help or Harm?Depression Can Deepen Over Time for Alzheimer's CaregiversA U.S. Pandemic of Depression, Too? Rates Are Triple Pre-COVID LevelsSeniors With Depression Show Resilience in Face of PandemicBlood Pressure Meds Don't Raise Risk of DepressionDepression May Hinder Recovery From Narrowed ArteriesVitamin D Won't Reduce Risk of DepressionCould Botox Injections Relieve Depression?Can Probiotics Help Ease Depression?AHA News: Persistent Depression Might Increase Heart Disease Risk for Women With HIVMom's Depression Can Lead to Behavior Problems in KidsInsomnia May Forecast Depression, Thinking Problems in Older PeopleIsolation During Coronavirus Pandemic a Trigger for DepressionDodge Depression During Coronavirus PandemicTherapy by Phone Helps Parkinson's Patients Manage DepressionMagnetic Brain 'Zap' Shows Promise Against Severe DepressionIs the 'Gratitude Movement' Overrated? Study Finds It Has LimitsDepressed Pregnant Women 3 Times More Likely to Turn to PotPreventive Intervention for Premature Infants Effective
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Suicide
Addictions: Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Pain Management

Vitamin D Won't Reduce Risk of Depression

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Aug 4th 2020

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For those battling debilitating depression, a new study delivers some bad news: Vitamin D supplements won't make a dent in improving mood.

While the "sunshine vitamin" is often touted as an alternative way to protect against depression, vitamin D's efficacy has remained unknown, the researchers said.

But "there was no significant benefit from the supplement for this purpose. It did not prevent depression or improve mood," said study author Dr. Olivia Okereke, of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

For the study, more than 18,000 men and women aged 50 or older were selected to take vitamin D3 or a placebo, for an average of five years.

Many other studies have found that low levels of vitamin D were tied with a higher risk for depression.

Among the participants, the risk of depression or depressive symptoms was not significantly different between those getting vitamin D supplements and those on the placebo, the researchers found. Also, no significant differences were seen between the groups in mood.

Still, "It's not time to throw out your vitamin D yet though, at least not without your doctor's advice," Okereke said in a hospital news release.

The report was published Aug. 4 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"Vitamin D is known to be essential for bone and metabolic health, but randomized trials have cast doubt on many of the other presumed benefits," said senior study author Dr. JoAnn Manson, from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

More information

For more on depression, see the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.