19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace.

SCAMHC serves all individuals regardless of inability to pay. Discounts for essential services are offered based on family size and income. For more information, contact (334) 222-2523 or our 24/7 Helpline at 1-877-530-0002.

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Unexplained Drop in Resting Heart Rate in Youth 'Not a Good Thing'Strike Out Kids' Overuse Injuries This Baseball SeasonMost Young Americans Eager to Get COVID Vaccine: PollMany Kids Who Develop Severe COVID-Linked Syndrome Have Neurologic SymptomsMost Parents OK About School Rules for Kids' Return to Sports: PollSome Kids Snore, and It Could Affect BehaviorKids With Autism Can Really Benefit From ExerciseFDA Approves First New Children's ADHD Drug in 10 YearsWhy Are ER Wait Times Getting Longer for Kids in Mental Health Crisis?About 40,000 U.S. Children Have Lost a Parent to COVID-19Is Empathy Born in Mom's First Hugs?Adding in Stem Cell Therapy Helps Beat a Common Childhood LeukemiaWhat Will Summer Camp Look Like This Year?When Will America's Kids Get Their COVID Vaccines?1 in 4 Parents Won't Vaccinate Their Kids Against COVID-19: PollEven in a Pandemic, Child Vision Tests Are CrucialPfizer Says Its COVID Vaccine Is Very Effective in Kids as Young as 12Secondhand Smoke Is Sending Kids to the ERDrug Shows Promise Against Rare Condition That Stunts Kids' GrowthWhen Coal-Fired Power Plants Close, Kids With Asthma Breathe EasierAnother Study Finds COVID Doesn't Spread in Schools With Proper SafeguardsNearly Half of U.S. Schools Now Offer In-Person LearningLockdowns Gave Boost to Type 1 Diabetes Control in KidsWildfire Smoke Can Send Kids With Asthma to the ERPandemic Has Many Kids Struggling With Weight IssuesLab-Made Heart Valves Can Grow Along With Youngest Heart PatientsSome Kids With Type 1 Diabetes Face High Risk of Severe COVID-19Virtual Learning Has Taken a Toll on Kids' & Parents' Mental HealthCDC Says 3 Feet of Social Distancing Now OK in Most ClassroomsWhich Kids' Sports Have Higher Odds for Head Injury?Social Distancing Probably Stopped 2020 Outbreak of Paralyzing Disorder in KidsAHA News: What Parents Should Know About Rare But Scary COVID-19-Related IllnessSchool Dental Care Program Could Cut Cavities in Half: StudySocial Media, Binge Eating Often Go Together for KidsStressed and Distracted, Kids and Their Teachers Say Virtual Learning Isn't WorkingSports Position Doesn't Affect Risk of Concussion-Linked CTE IllnessPandemic Putting Added Strain on Parents of Kids With CancerDogs and Kids Are 'In Sync,' Study ShowsTeachers Main Drivers of School COVID Outbreaks, So Vaccinations Needed: StudyTips to Keep Young Athletes Injury-FreeMental Illness in Childhood Could Mean Worse Physical Health Decades LaterKids' Robust Immune Systems May Shield Them From COVID-19: StudyFertility Treatments Might Affect Kids' Growth, But Not for LongMom's Heart Health While Pregnant Could Influence Her Child's Health for YearsPandemic Has Affected Kids' Dental Health: PollNew Rabies Prevention Treatment Also Works in Kids: StudyWhen Will Kids Get the COVID Vaccines?U.S. Schools Can Reopen, With Safeguards in Place: CDCFetal Surgery Is Changing Lives for Kids With Spina BifidaKids Who Got Flu Shot Had Milder COVID Symptoms: Study
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting

Lab-Made Heart Valves Can Grow Along With Youngest Heart Patients

HealthDay News
by Cara Murez
Updated: Mar 22nd 2021

new article illustration

MONDAY, March 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Lab-created heart valves that grow with the recipient could spare kids born with heart defects from the repeated valve-replacement surgeries they now endure.

University of Minnesota researchers found that lab-created valves implanted in young lambs for a year were capable of growing within the recipient.

"This is a huge step forward in pediatric heart research," said senior researcher Robert Tranquillo, a professor of biomedical and chemical engineering and materials science. "This is the first demonstration that a valve implanted into a large animal model, in our case a lamb, can grow with the animal into adulthood."

Right now, the only accepted options for kids with heart defects are valves made from chemically treated animal tissues. But these don't grow with the child and often become dysfunctional because of calcium buildup, requiring repeated replacement.

The cultured valves tested in this study had less calcium buildup and they grew with the recipient.

Researchers will need to confirm that this science translates to humans. Results of animal studies aren't always the same in people.

But, if these are, the science could prevent repeated valve replacement surgeries in thousands of babies born each year with heart defects. They currently endure five or more surgeries before they can receive a mechanical valve in adulthood.

Researchers said the tested valves can also be stored for six months, providing surgeons with easier access to transplant tissue.

For the project, researchers used a specialized tissue-engineering technique they previously developed to generate vessel-like tubes in the lab from sheep skin cells.

To develop the valves, they first combined the cells with a gelatin-like material and then provided nutrients necessary for cell growth.

When tissue-like tubes were formed, special detergents washed away the sheep cells so they wouldn't cause an immune reaction when implanted.

Researchers precisely sewed three tubes together into a closed ring, then trimmed them slightly to create leaflets that replicate a structure similar to a natural heart valve. The structure worked like a valve and also grew.

This second generation of tri-tube valves were implanted into the pulmonary artery of three lambs. After 52 weeks, the valves had regenerated and the diameter increased to a normal valve size. On ultrasound images, researchers also saw a 17% to 34% increase in length of the leaflets.

The next step will be implanting the valve directly into the right ventricle of the heart to mimic the most common surgical repair. Then, researchers will seek U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to launch human clinical trials.

"If we can get these valves approved someday for children, it would have such a big impact on the children who suffer from heart defects and their families who have to deal with the immense stress of multiple surgeries," Tranquillo said. "We could potentially reduce the number of surgeries these children would have to endure from five to one. That's the dream."

The study was published March 17 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

The valve-making procedure has been patented and licensed to the University of Minnesota startup company Vascudyne Inc. The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more information on congenital heart defects.


SOURCE: University of Minnesota Twin Cities, news release, March 17, 2021