19815 Bay Branch Rd
Andalusia, Alabama 36420
(334) 222-2523
HELPLINE: 1-877-530-0002



Facebook    

 

SCAMHC is an approved Mental Health site for the National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment program.  Find out the program details and see if you qualify by visiting: http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/

SCAMHC is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and maintains a Drug-Free Workplace.

SCAMHC serves all individuals regardless of inability to pay. Discounts for essential services are offered based on family size and income. For more information, contact (334) 222-2523 or our 24/7 Helpline at 1-877-530-0002.

 

 


powered by centersite dot net
Alzheimers Disease and other Cognitive Disorders
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction & Causes of Cognitive DisordersDementiaAlzheimer's DiseaseOther Cognitive DisordersDementia Coping Skills & Behavior ManagementTraumatic Brain Injury (TBI)Conclusion and Resources
More InformationLatest News
Reminder Apps on Smartphones May Help in Early DementiaNeurologists' Group Issues Guidance to Families on Controversial Alzheimer's DrugTrial Begins of Nasal Vaccine for Alzheimer's DiseaseAlzheimer's Diagnosis May Come With Big Cost to Social LifeMany People May Be Eating Their Way to DementiaCould Estrogen Help Shield Women's Brains From Alzheimer's?Purrfect Pal: Robotic Cats May Help People With DementiaRight Amount of Sleep May Be Important in Early Alzheimer'sAHA News: Hearing Loss and the Link to DementiaDepression in Early Life May Up Dementia Risk LaterScientists Untangle Why Diabetes Might Raise Alzheimer's RiskTracking Key Protein Helps Predict Outcomes in TBI PatientsMIND Diet May Guard Against Alzheimer'sSigns of Early Alzheimer's May Be Spotted in Brain StemCould Cholesterol Help Drive Alzheimer's Disease?Common Eye Conditions Tied to Higher Risk for DementiaMultigenerational Study Finds Links Between ADHD, Dementia RiskMost Alzheimer's Patients Wouldn't Have Qualified for Controversial Drug's Trial: StudyCould Traffic Noise Raise Your Odds for Dementia?AHA News: What Are Researchers Doing to Stop Dementia?A Mentally Challenging Job Could Help Ward Off DementiaDirty Air, Higher Dementia Risk?An ALS Drug Shows Early Promise Against Alzheimer'sAHA News: Dementia Can Complicate Heart Recovery and TreatmentDeaths From Alzheimer's Far More Common in Rural AmericaCould COVID-19 Accelerate Alzheimer's Symptoms?Dementia Cases Will Nearly Triple Worldwide by 2050: StudyFDA Panel Advisor Who Panned New Alzheimer's Drug Speaks Out'Light Flash' Treatment Might Help Slow Alzheimer'sCleaning Up the Air Could Help Prevent Alzheimer'sLong-Term Outlook for Most With Serious Brain Injury Is Better Than ThoughtDrug Shows Promise in Easing Dementia-Linked PsychosisAHA News: Diabetes and Dementia Risk: Another Good Reason to Keep Blood Sugar in Check1 in 20 Cases of Dementia Occurs in People Under 65Could Menopausal Hormone Therapy Reduce Women's Odds for Dementia?Reading, Puzzles May Delay Alzheimer's by 5 Years: StudyTwo Major Health Systems Won't Administer Controversial New Alzheimer's DrugMost Marriages Survive a Spouse's Brain InjuryMedicare Mulls Coverage for Controversial Alzheimer's DrugFDA Head Asks for Investigation Into Alzheimer's Drug ApprovalNew Prescribing Instructions Tighten Use of Controversial Alzheimer's DrugMissing Teeth, Higher Odds for Dementia?AHA News: Smoking Harms the Brain, Raises Dementia Risk – But Not If You QuitHealthy Living Can Lower Your Odds for Alzheimer'sKeeping Same Nurse for All Home Health Care May Be Crucial for Dementia PatientsMost Cases of Dementia in U.S. Seniors Go Undiagnosed: StudyLilly to Seek FDA Approval for New Alzheimer's DrugCould a Type of Statin Raise Dementia Risks?Good News, Bad News From Alzheimer's Vaccine TrialPoor Sleep After Head Injury Could Point to Dementia Risk
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Aging & Geriatrics
Memory Problems
Elder Care

Many People May Be Eating Their Way to Dementia

HealthDay News
by By Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Nov 11th 2021

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Nov. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Eating lots of fruits, veggies, beans and other foods with inflammation-cooling properties may lower your odds of developing dementia as you age.

But, if your diet is loaded with pro-inflammatory foods, you may be up to three times more likely to experience memory loss and issues with language, problem-solving and other thinking skills as you age, new research suggests.

"A less inflammatory diet relates to less risk for developing dementia," said study author Dr. Nikolaos Scarmeas, an associate professor of neurology at National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in Greece.

Exactly how, or even if, diet can help stave off dementia and preserve brain health isn't fully understood yet. "Diet may affect brain health via many mechanisms, and according to our findings, inflammation may be one of them," Scarmeas said.

For the study, more than 1,000 people in Greece (average age: 73) completed a questionnaire to determine the inflammatory potential or score of their diet. No one had dementia when the study began. Six percent developed dementia during a follow-up of just over three years.

Dietary inflammation scores range from -8.87 to 7.98, with higher scores pointing to a more inflammatory diet. Folks with the lowest scores were less likely to develop dementia than folks with higher ones, the study showed.

Each 1-point increase in dietary inflammatory score was associated with a 21% increase in dementia risk.

Those with the lowest scores consumed about 20 servings of fruit, 19 of vegetables, 4 of beans or other legumes, and 11 of coffee or tea each week. In contrast, people with the highest scores ate about 9 servings of fruit, 10 of vegetables, 2 of legumes, and 9 of coffee or tea per week.

It's not the whole food per se, but all the nutrients it contains that contributes to its inflammatory potential, Scarmeas explained. Each food has both pro- and anti-inflammatory ingredients.

"In general, a diet with more fruits, vegetables, beans, tea or coffee is a more anti-inflammatory one," he said.

The study does not prove that eating an anti-inflammatory diet prevents brain aging and dementia, only that there's a link between them.

Longer follow-up is needed to draw any firm conclusions on how inflammatory diet score affects brain health, Scarmeas cautioned.

The findings were published Nov. 10 in the journal Neurology.

Dr. Thomas Holland, a physician-scientist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, reviewed the findings.

"This study is lending further weight to the mechanism inflammation -- specifically neuro-inflammation -- that much of us understand as being one of the main players in causing cognitive decline and Alzheimer's dementia," he said.

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia.

For brain health, Holland recommends the MIND diet, the Mediterranean diet or the DASH diet. All three center on lean meats, fish, whole grains, fresh produce and olive oil. The MIND (or Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) diet combines elements from the Mediterranean and DASH diets and was specifically designed to help combat dementia.

So what should you eat to help boost brain health? Holland offered his suggestions.

"Berries, dark leafy greens, nuts, whole wheat, garlic, onions, peppers, tomatoes, extra virgin olive oil, non-fried dark fish, and poultry," he said.

These foods may decrease the strength and/or duration of the inflammatory process in your body and brain, Holland said. Some act as antioxidants, which sop up damaging free radicals and lower inflammation.

"Avoiding a Western-type diet pattern is also important, including reduced intake of whole-fat dairy, fried or fast foods, pastries and red meat," he said.

Holland noted that pro-inflammatory foods can lead to uncontrolled inflammation and damage.

"If that damage occurs in the brain, the potential to develop dementia exists," he said.

More information

Learn what's new in dementia prevention at the Alzheimer's Association.

SOURCES: Nikolaos Scarmeas, MD, associate professor, neurology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece; Thomas Holland, MD, MS, physician-scientist, Rush University, Chicago; Neurology, Nov. 10, 2021